C Pam Zhang struck Gold with her debut novel

C Pam Zhang struck Gold with her debut novel

C Pam Zhang explores immigration in How Much of These Hills Is Gold, a coming-of-age story of two newly orphaned siblings set during the Gold Rush. It takes bits and pieces of topics you might be familiar with, but stretches those ideas in new ways. The book explores family secrets and young ambition in the face of desperation.

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M. Randal O’Wain reveals the raw and honest truth of the South in ‘Meander Belt’

M. Randal O’Wain reveals the raw and honest truth of the South in ‘Meander Belt’

The essays in M. Randal O’Wains debut memoir, Meander Belt, tap into what life was truly like growing up in the rural South. Subtitled “Family, Loss, and Coming of Age in the Working Class South,” the book is a raw and intimate portrayal of an area often at the mercy of stereotypes or often altogether left out of media portrayals.

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Karen Raney on crafting the characters in her coming-of-age debut ‘All the Water in the World’

Karen Raney on crafting the characters in her coming-of-age debut ‘All the Water in the World’

The characters that inhabit All the Water in the World, the debut novel from Karen Raney, are like tapping into the third season of your favorite television series. They’re all incredibly rounded and grounded.

In the midst of dealing with her relationship with her mother, learning to love for the first time, and all of the pains of being 16-years-old, Maddy is also diagnosed with cancer. Told between alternating chapters from Maddy and then her mother’s perspective, the story is equally heartwarming and heartbreaking.

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Stephanie Jimenez’s coming-of-age novel ‘They Could Have Named Her Anything’ is eye-opening for both teens and adults

Stephanie Jimenez’s coming-of-age novel ‘They Could Have Named Her Anything’ is eye-opening for both teens and adults

Stephanie Jimenez‘s debut novel They Could Have Named Her Anything is about a Latinx teenager named Maria Anís Rosario coming into her own sexually as she grapples with racial and class issues that many members of the community are facing today. It is an honest and raw insight into what it’s like to be a girl in today’s world.

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